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Luis Barragán biography

Luis Barragán biography

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Synopsis
In 1931, after getting a degree in civil engineering, Luis Barragán met Bac and Le Corbusier, both of whom were to have a profound influence on his work. He began to conceive new methods by which he could create “emotional architecture,” which would encourage meditation and quietude. For his serene and evocative houses, gardens, plazas and fountains, he won the Pritzker Prize in 1980.

CONTENTS
Synopsis
Profile
Profile(born March 9, 1902, Guadalajara, Mexico—died November 22, 1988, Mexico City) Mexican engineer and architect, whose serene and evocative houses, gardens, plazas, and fountains won him the Pritzker Prize in 1980.

Barragán, who was born into a wealthy family, grew up on a ranch near Guadalajara, Mexico. He attended the Escuela Libre de Ingenieros (Free School of Engineers) there, taking a degree in civil engineering in 1923 and continuing his studies in architecture. In 1924 he began to travel, mostly in Spain, France, Italy, and Greece. During this period of extensive travel, he first came across the published works of the German-born French landscape architect and illustrator Ferdinand Bac. When Barragán returned to Guadalajara, he began to work with his brother Juan José and completed his first project in 1927. Four years later he again went to Europe, where he met Bac and Le Corbusier, both of whom were to have a profound influence on his work.

On his return to Guadalajara, Barragán began to conceive new methods by which he could create what he called an “emotional architecture,” one that would encourage meditation and quietude. In 1935 he moved to Mexico City, where he began to apply the principles of Le Corbusier and the International school. With the evolution of his own ideas, his works began to take on the elements that characterize his mature period—natural siting, simple surfaces (slabs of concrete, immense walls of stucco), water features, the use of colour, and so on. From roughly 1943 to 1952 he developed El Pedregal (“The Lava”) as a subdivision of Mexico City, taking great care to incorporate intact its volcanic outcroppings and other natural formations.

Barragán's output was not large. The majority of the structures he built are in Guadalajara and Mexico City. Among his notable works are the house he created around existing buildings at 20–22 Calle Ramírez in the Tacubaya district of Mexico City, where he lived beginning in the 1940s; numbers 10 and 12 Avenida de las Fuentes, among the first houses to be built in El Pedregal, and the Prieto López House there; the San Cristóbal Stables/Egerstrom House; the Gálvez House; and the Gilardi House. The Barragan Foundation (1996) is located near Basel, Switzerland.

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